TheOsteo Clinic | Tiger Woods road to recovery
Article on Tiger Woods injury rehabilitation
Sport star injuries, Rehabilitation in sport, Tiger Woods
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‘The Walking Miracle’

30 Mar ‘The Walking Miracle’

Can he really do it again?

The title of this post is self proclaimed and the question asked in the sub heading above is what many people will be asking. Come Sunday the 8th April everybody we will no the answer. I’m of course talking about Tiger Woods and the Masters.

The Injuries

1994: Tumour removal

2002: Cyst removal, fluid drain

2006: Shoulder

2007: Ruptured ACL

2008: Arthroscopic knee surgery

2008: ACL repair

2008-09: Torn right Achilles tendon

2010: Apparent neck injury

2011: Medial collateral injury and  Achilles flare up

2012: Achilles re-injury

2014: Back issues and first surgery

2015: 2nd Back surgery

2016: 3rd Back surgery

2017: 4th Back surgery

The Rehabilitation

From the list above, most of the injuries have the potential to be career altering and even career ending yet, remarkably he was able to enjoy successes until the latter years..

After the recovery from the surgery he would then have to start a start strength conditioning training to get back to golf practice before even picking up a club. Practising 2-3 hours daily focusing on technique follows.

In his own words this is what he was used to:

“Well, I used to get up in the morning, run four miles,” Woods said. “Then I’d go to the gym, do my lift. Then I’d hit balls for two to three hours. I’d go play, come back, work on my short game. I’d go run another four more miles, and then if anyone wanted to play basketball or tennis, I would go play basketball or tennis. That was a daily routine. I’m not doing any of that now..”

One member of his team who was his trainer Keith Klevan had this to say about the training: the regimen involves free weights, machines, balls, and rollers and it has two specific components: Manual Therapy: A system of extensive stretching (34 to 40 minutes before each workout) and manipulation/mobilization of Woods’ muscles and joints.

Now rehab involves a mixture of a unique weight-training regimen and distance running. Since he joined the Tour in 1996, Woods  has gone from 158 pounds on his 6’2″ frame to 183 pounds give or take a few pounds.

The return

Now he is set for big stage at Augusta and with his current form it looks like he has rolled back the clock to his former glory days.

Regardless of whether he wins or not, it has been a remarkable journey and a wonderful example of how the body can match minds determination.

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